Fun weekend at Taylor Creek Visitor Center

Fun at Lake Tahoe

Time for fun at Lake Tahoe

For a fun weekend for you and your children, consider heading up to the Taylor Creek Visitor Center at Lake Tahoe. Over the weekend of June 24 and 25, two festivals will take place.

The “Wild Tahoe Weekend” is sponsored by the US Forest Service Lake Tahoe folks and the Tahoe Institute for Natural Science. Both days are free. You’ll need to take or buy snacks and lunch.

Saturday, from 10:00 am to 4:00 pm, is dedicated to the 6th annual Native Species Festival, while Sunday, 10:00 am to 3:30 pm, is for the 7th annual Lake Tahoe Bird Festival. Lulu the Lahontan Cutthroat Trout and Smokey the Bear will be there, along with displays and nature walks.

It will be warm over the weekend. Sunscreen, hats, plenty of water should be on your list to take with you. These festivals are especially fun for children of all ages.

Taylor Creek is spectacular right now, and the Visitor’s center, 3 miles north of South Lake Tahoe on State Route 89, is a wonderful place to spend the day with your children, or with just you, enjoying an amazing early summer weekend.


Posted in blogging, education, families, Lake Tahoe, Outdoor Recreation, outside treks

The Other Flume Trail in Incline Village

Rider and bike at Lake Tahoe

Ride, ride, ride, and do it safely.

The Other Flume Trail

What other Flume Trail?  The one known as the Incline Flume Trail. Like the other one, the trail is on what used to be a flume that sent logs down to the Lake in the Comstock Era. It’s pretty family friendly, more flatish that its cousin simply known as The Flume Trail. The trail is an extensive project that involves the Tahoe Fund, Tahoe Area Mountain Bike Association, the USFS, Friends of Incline Trails, the Forest Service, Nevada State Parks, Nevada Land Trust, Washoe County and Incline General Improvement District and others.

The trail project highlights the ongoing efforts of the Tahoe Fund and others to secure high quality family friendly recreation opportunities throughout the Tahoe Basin.

Read about the trail at the Tahoe Fund website. Get your gear on, pump up the tires and head over there for what is a fun ride with outrageous views of Lake Tahoe.


Posted in bicycles, blogging, cycling, families, health, Lake Tahoe, Outdoor Recreation, outside treks

Bear Valley Summer

Summer fun at Bear Valley

Bear Valley summer!

Bear Valley is another recreation paradise in the Sierra. Located at 2280 State Route 207, Bear Valley, CA, 95223, the area has plenty of skiing, Alpine and Nordic, during ski season. The rest of the year there’s hiking,mountain biking, kayaking, canoeing, boating, fishing, playing, wandering, music, art, and a whole lot of fun, family oriented events.

What’s going on this summer:

Marc Gendron who is the PR guy at the resort said that there’s something for everyone up there. He pointed out in a press release that “… guests and visitors now have more lodging options to experience Bear Valley Mountain and the amazing view of the Sierra during the summer and early fall months. New lodging opportunities include eco-friendly glamping units facing the Mokolumne Peak and Canyon, RV parking, and the newly renovated Bear Valley Lodge.”

To take advantage of what the resort offers it’ll take more than a day. Plan to stay a couple of days and enjoy the area. The drive over Ebbetts Pass, at 8,730 feet, from El Dorado and Alpine Counties, is stunning all by itself, and well worth the drive.

The summer event schedule is full of exciting opportunities for everyone who enjoys being out and about and active in the mountains.

For the full text of what Marc sent out, check it out here.


Posted in families, Outdoor Recreation, outside treks

Friends of Hope Valley

FRIENDS OF HOPE VALLEY WORK DAY & BENEFIT CONCERT

If you enjoy all the recreational fun in Hope Valley, consider giving a bit of time to help out. This is a great way to spend some time in a very beautiful place. The information below is courtesy of Friends of Hope Valley:

Friends of Hope Valley’s annual workday is June 10th… at 9:00am. Participants will meet at Pickett’s Junction (Hwy 88/Hwy 89) in Hope Valley. Join in a work party of their choice. Projects include watershed habitat improvement, general clean up and fence repair. FOHV members are welcome to stay and attend the general membership meeting at noon. Please mark your calendars and join us. Bring work gloves, shovels, and fencing pliers.

June 11th…The Back Forty Bluegrass band will returns to the Friends of Hope Valley benefit concert. This event will take place at Sorensen’s Resort located on Highway 88 in Hope Valley. Accompanying the Back Forty will be “local folkies” The Ten Dollar Pony, Larry Nair and Beth Oliverto. Based in Gardnerville, they play a lively blend of original and cover tunes.
Spend an afternoon in a beautiful setting at Sorensen’s Resort. Good music and good food will be guaranteed. Sorensen’s Resort is generous enough to host this event and match the funds raised. $10 donation requested. No host BBQ…. 1pm to 4pm

Check out Sorensen’s Resort for more events and information


Posted in education, families, Outdoor Recreation, outside treks

Season Passes around Tahoe

Read to ski

Groomed and ready at SAT Photo courtesy of Thea Hardy, SAT PR

It’s that time of year when season pass prices hit the ski market around Tahoe. These prices are most often the most economical you’ll see. It’s time to prove you’re an optimist about next season’s snowfall. You’ll be in the group who absolutely knows it’s going to be worth that season pass.

If you ski four times you’ll pay for the pass in most cases. From your fifth trip to the lifts to the end of the season, you’ll be skiing and riding for free.

Here’s a list of the resorts in the Tahoe area, plus Bear Valley, their phone numbers, website links, and details on the various versions of a season pass for the 2017-2018 ski season. All of the rates listed below will go up, with some of the passes offered on a limited basis. Check the websites for full information regarding prices.

SIERRA-AT- TAHOE www.sierraattahoe.com / (530) 659-747

Certified Unserious Unlimited Season Pass

Adults $329 for, Young Adults (13-22) $279 or College Students (proof of 6 fall 2017 credits), Child (5-12) or Super Seniors (70+) $139

Unrestricted access to the mountain seven days a week, all season long, with no restrictions the entire 2017/18 season. No blackout dates on powder days, holidays or weekends when other passholders may get shutout. Ski or ride at Sierra for free the rest of the 2016/17 season.

Also: Skiing/riding for free at other resorts through the Powder Alliance for the 2017/18 season. Made up of the greatest powder stashes in the West, the Powder Alliance includes three days of FREE skiing/riding at 13 other mountains including Crested Butte, Stevens Pass, Timberline, Schweitzer, China Peak, Mountain High, Arizona Snowbowl, Mt. Hood Skibowl, Angel Fire Resort, Bridger Bowl, Whitewater and Silverstar in BC, Canada, plus Kiroro Resort in Hokkaido, Japan.

Sierra Resort Value Pass: $279 : The Sierra-at-Tahoe Value Pass is perfect for locals who ski midweek and like to  have the mountain to themselves. The Sierra Value Pass is valid Sunday through Friday excluding blackout dates: 2017/18 Blackout Dates: December 26-31, 2017, January 13-14, 2018, February 17-18, 2018.

KIRKWOOD MOUNTAIN RESORT www.kirkwood.com / (209) 258-6000

Kirkwood’s season passes range from the:

EpicAdults $859 and Child $449, (which gives you unlimited skiing at Kirkwood and at these other resorts: Vail, Beaver Creek, Whistler Blackcomb, Breckenridge, Keystone, Park City, Heavenly, Northstar, Stowe, Wilmot, Afton Alps, Mt. Brighton, Perisher and Arapahoe Basin, plus access to 30 European resorts across Austria, France, Italy and Switzerland), to the:

Kirkwood Pass: (unlimited skiing at Kirkwood)   Adults $549, $439 teen and senior (65+) and $279 child and through 7 more categories.

The last is the :College Pass: $489.

Most come with access to other resorts, buddy tickets and other goodies. You’ll have to go to their site to take a look at their extensive offerings.

HEAVENLY MOUNTAIN RESORT www.skiheavenly.com / (775) 586-7000

Heavenly is in the same group at Kirkwood. The season passes here also span 8 categories.

Epic Pass: Adults $859and $449 child, with the same access to the list of resorts at Kirkwood, to the unlimited

Tahoe Local PassAdults $549,  Teen $439,  Child $279, to the

College Pass at $489 or $369. Go to their website to see all their extensive offerings. Each pass has other goodies attached to it.

HOMEWOOD MOUNTAIN RESORT www.skihomewood.com / (530) 525-2900/ (530) 584-6800

Homewood’s unlimited: Adults $409, Teen $329, Junior $159, Senior (62-69) $269, and Super Senior (70+) $219

College Pass (unlimited): $259

Family Pass (unlimited): (2 adults, 2 teens or child) $1059. Children to age 4 ski free.

Perks include 5 discounted friends and family tickets (30% off) plus 10% off food, beverages, rentals, demos and retail. There’s also access to Red Lodge Mountain (unlimited) and Whitefish (5 days) (Montana), Diamond Peak, Brundage Mountain (5 days) (Idaho) ½ price at Alta (Utah)

GRANLIBAKKEN RESORT www.granlibakken.com /(530) 581-7533 / (530) 583-4242  **These are their normal prices throughout the season. They do not offer season passes. Granlibakken rates are Adults $30, $35 Holiday, $16 half-day, Child (12 and under) $20 full day, $25 holiday, $10 half-day.

ALPINE MEADOWS www.skialpine.com / (530) 581-8374  SQUAW VALLEY www.squaw.com / (530) 452-4335  Season passes are the same for both resorts.

Gold (unlimited): Adults (19-64) $869, Young  Adults (13-18) $719, Child (5-12) $389, Senior (65-75) $719 and Super Senior (76+) $389.

Silver(10 blackout dates–December 26 – 31, 2017; January 13-14, 2018; February 17 – 18, 2018):  Adults (19-64) $659,Young Adults (13-18) $489, Child (5-12) $299, Senior (65-75) $489 and Super Senior (76+) $299.

Bronze (Valid Monday-Friday; not valid on any Saturdays or Sundays and December 26 – 31, 2017; January 13-14, 2018; February 17 – 18, 2018):Adults (19-64) $499, Young Adults (13-18) $409, Senior (65-75) $409.

College: unlimited $469

6 discounted friends and family lift tickets for all pass types, 10% off at Squaw Valley Alpine Meadows owned food and beverage locations. There’s more. Check out their website for full details.

NORTHSTAR CALIFORNIA www.northstarcalifornia.com / (530) 562-1330/ (530) 562-2267

Season passes are the same as Kirkwood’s, with the addition of the Tahoe Value College, $369:  Ski 7 days a week at Heavenly and 6 days a week at Northstar and Kirkwood. Restrictions: Heavenly, Northstar, Kirkwood blackouts 11/24/17-11/25/17, 12/26-12/31, 1/13/2018, 1/13/18-2/18/18, plus all Saturdays at Northstar and Kirkwood.

Other perks include buddy tickets, ski with a friend, discounts at other resorts.

DIAMOND PEAK www.diamondpeak.com /(775) 831-1177

Diamond Peak passes: Adults (24-64, unlimited) $379; mid-week $279, Youth (13-23)/ College: $219; mid-week $179, Child (7-12)/Senior (65-69) $159; mid-week $139 Super Senior (70-79) $139; mid-week $119; 6 and under, 80+, Free all the time.

Discounted bring-a-friend tickets, 4 free bonus non-holiday lift tickets at select partner resorts including: Homewood Mountain Resort, Red Lodge Mountain, Bogus Basin and more partners TBD. Check the website for full details.

Mt. ROSE SKI TAHOE www.skirose.com / 800-SKIROSE/ (775) 849-0704

Season passes at the Rose:  Adults (24+, unlimited) $449; Young Adults (16-23) $349, Child $199.

Mid-week at the Rose: MON – FRI Not Valid Dec 25-29, Jan 15, Feb 19. Call for pricing.

TAHOE DONNER XC www.skitahoedonner.com / (530) 587-9484  

Season passes:  Adults (18-59, unlimited) $309; Junior (13-17) $204; Child (7-12) $159, Senior (60-69) $164, Super Senior (70+) Free.

BOREAL MOUNTAIN RESORT www.rideboreal.com / (530) 426-3666  

Visit their website for details. 2017-2018 season pass prices are not posted yet.

SODA SPRINGS WINTER RESORT www.skisodasprings.com / (530) 426-3901

Adults (24-59): $229; Young  Adults (18-23) $169; Teen (13-17) $169; Child (5-12) $129; Mini (4 and under) $29;

Senior (60+) $49. All prices are unlimited access to Soda Springs.

ROYAL GORGE XC  www.royalgorge.com / (530) 426-3871 Cross country heaven!  

Adults (23-64) $309; Young  Adults (13-22 ) $289; Senior (65-74) $289; Child (0-12) Free Daily Pass (one time $25 processing fee applied to receive season pass media–the actual pass); Super Senior (75+) Free Daily Pass (one time $25 processing fee applied to receive season pass media–the actual pass). For complete details visit the website.

SUGAR BOWL SKI RESORT www.sugarbowl.com / (530) 426-1111

Season passes, with perks: Child (5 and under) $45 (also gives access to xc skiing at Royal Gorge).

Adults (23-64,unrestricted) $689, Young Adults (13-22) $479, Senior (65-74) $479, Child (6-12) and Super Senior (75+) $299

Slightly Restricted (blackout dates: 12/26/17-1/1/18, 1/13-14/18 (Sat/Sun of MLK, 2/17-18/18 (Sat/Sun of Presidents Day Weekend.):

Adults $479, Young Adults $359, Senior (65-74) $359

Mid-Week (Valid Monday-Friday, excluding holidays, blackout dates 12/26-29/2017, 1/1/2018)

Adults (23-64) $299, Young Adults (13-22, unrestricted) $269, Senior (65-74) $269

Check their website for additional cost to season pass for xc skiing at Royal Gorge for all other ages, plus pass perks)

DONNER SKI RANCH www.donnerskiranch.com / (530) 426-3635

As they say on their website: “Low lift ticket prices every day with no variable pricing, and no surprises”

Adults (18-69) $299, Teen (13-17) $249, Child (6-12)$149, Young Child (0-6), Senior (70+) $199

Bear Valley www.bearvalley.com / (209)753-2301 Peaks Pass and Polar Pass both offer unrestricted access to lifts for the spring of 2017 and the entire 2017/18 season. See their website for complete information about perks.

Peaks: Adults (23-64) $599, Youth (14-22) $499, Child (6-13) $329, Kinder (5 and under) $89, Senior (65-69) $329, Super Senior (70+) $89

Polar: Adults (23-64) $449, Youth (14-22) $339, Child (6-13) $259, Kinder (5 and under) $79, Senior (65-69) $259, Super Senior (70+) $79

College Pass: (College students taking a minimum of 12 credit hours at the time of pass pick-up. Please bring a transcript in order to pick up.): $219

Military Pass: (Active duty US military members. Please bring an active military ID in order to pick up.): $219


Posted in families, Lake Tahoe, Outdoor Recreation, outside treks, ski resorts, skiing, snow

Season Extended

buried in snow SAT sign

The SAT sign at Hwy 50, buried
Photo courtesy of Sierra-at-Tahoe PR

Skiing season just got extended. All that snow, and what is falling now, has added up to more than a epic fall and winter on the trails. The season has also been extended. Thea Hardy, Public Relations at Sierra-at-Tahoe, has announced that their season will run through to April 23. That’s good news for anyone who counts Sierra as home base for skiing and riding.

Sierra traditionally follows the last official day with Customer Appreciation Day. It will be on Monday, April 24, 2017. This day is dedicated to “…reminiscing about the plentiful powder days with high fives in celebration of another awesome season,” said Hardy.

Skiers and riders of all ages can purchase a lift ticket for only $35 on April 24, 2017. Lift ticket proceeds on Customer Appreciation Day will benefit youth recreation and education including baseball, soccer, swimming and other youth activities in South Lake Tahoe. Sierra-at-Tahoe is a dedicated supporter of youth sports and the South Lake Tahoe community in general.

John Rice, Sierra’s long time General Manger put it this way: “With 537 inches of natural snowfall and counting, this season has truly been one for the books. Customer Appreciation Day is all about saying thank you. We want to show our most loyal guests that we value this community and are willing to support year round recreational opportunities for our kids.”

The resort  will operate a limited number of lifts from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. including Grandview Express and Easy Rider Express. All guests are invited to join John Rice and the rest of Sierra’s team for the official “last run of the season” from the top of Grandview Express beginning at 2 p.m. This last run is arguably the best run of the season. The resort staff and guests simply have a magical time heading to the base to close out the season. Last call at the Sierra Pub will be 2:45 p.m., in time for the ending of all winter operations at 3 p.m. Take advantage of a wonderful last day for this season at Sierra.

Skiing in powder at SAT

Powder day at SAT March 2017
Photo courtesy of David Amirault/SAT PR

Read to ski

Groomed and ready at SAT Photo courtesy of Thea Hardy, SAT PR

Close to getting on the lift

Heading for the ride up the mountain at SAT
Photo courtesy of David Amirault/SAT PR


Posted in families, Lake Tahoe, Outdoor Recreation, ski resorts, skiing, snow

Change of Seasons

Autumn is here!

Autumn is here!

Spring and summer, with all they offer, have come and gone for the year. Autumn rolled in right on time and is in full burst right now. Around here, which is in the Sierra, the weather has gotten colder, the days shorter, the leaves on the trees have done their color dance and have drifted to the ground. What a wonderful sound, riding through them on all the back roads up here! It’s my favorite time of year.

We’ve had wind, rain, hail, and snow. The Tahoe area is gearing up for what they hope is a great ski season. The snow guns are running, and opening days at the resorts are coming up. In the meantime, there’s plenty of hiking and riding to do.

As we get deeper in to autumn it is important to pay attention to the shorter days. Hikes and rides that were easily completed in daylight just a couple of weeks ago now have to be tweaked. Running out of daylight while still out on the trails is generally a bad idea. What do you do?

Start earlier if it’s possible. If not, simply modify your trek. Pay attention to when the sunlight starts to dim. Daylight hours will progressively get shorter until the Winter Solstice, in December.

Make certain that you have headlamps or flashlights with you, with fresh batteries. Change the batteries on your bike, front and rear. Make certain that they work. If you do find yourself out there at dusk, heading to dark, you’ll need these.

The temperatures in the mountains will fluctuate, from comfortable to cold, all in the course of a day, and while you’re out riding or hiking. Wear layers so that you will be able to add or shed a layer or two as needed. If you are out in the mountains, or in the forests, leave your cotton duds at home. While cotton is a fine material, it’s not your friend out there. Your layers should be wool, a wool blend, or synthetics.

Above all, just get out there. It’s a wonderful time to be out and about. Take advantage of the autumn landscape before it turns white with snow. Snow changes everything. Get outside!


Posted in bicycles, blogging, cycling, education, families, health, Outdoor Recreation, outside treks

May is over, so is bike month

Fat bike in snow

Remember this weather?

Well, now what? May is Bike Month, oddly enough, ends on the last day of May. Several million miles were pedaled across the nation. Lot’s of people may have decided to either start riding again, or ride more. Bike shops most likely sold a few more bikes, helmets, and what not. What now?

Keep riding of course. Get your bike tuned up, get ready for the late spring ride into summer, heading to autumn. This time of year is generally pretty mild which makes outdoor rec a delight. As the season continues we all know it will get more warm, and in some areas downright hot. Ride now, get a good base under your fitness level, then, when it does warm up, you should do alright.

If you live in an area that gets hot, or hot and humid, you know you have to slow down and stay hydrated. Time your rides, hikes, and so on for cooler parts of the day, if there are any. The whole point is to simply enjoy riding your bike or whatever outdoor activity that turns your prop.

Next up in the big leagues is the Tour de France. The main reason to watch it is to hear Phil Liggett and Paul Sherwin offer their expert and hilarious commentary on the race. It’s a hoot. Somewhere in there is that rather wonderful tour in Colorado too. Always amazing to see the young pros and what they are capable of doing. With great hope, it is done on natural talent and work only. Always iffy in the bike world.

Ah well, enjoy your time on your bike or out on the lakes or in the forests wherever you live.


Posted in bicycles, blogging, cycling, education, families, health, outside treks, Uncategorized

May is Bike Month

mibm 2016 logo

Believe it or not, we’ve gone through all of April. It’s May, and that means it’s Bike Month. For the entire month of May there is an increased focus on all things bicycle. It’s a good time to ride, whether you are experienced, a novice, or just plain rusty. This is the time to gear up and start pedaling.

What is May is Bike Month? It is a month long effort and campaign throughout the U.S. that promotes bicycles as a mode of transportation. The aim is for as many people as possible to ride bikes while running errands, commuting to work, actually working, or for recreation and health. With more people riding, the number of autos on the road decreases. A direct result of that is better air quality and less traffic congestion. In theory it also focuses attention on the need for greater investment in bicycle infrastructure and facilities. Throw in that it’s fun, burns calories, and gets you moving, and it’s a winner all the way.

More bikes on the roads points out the need for more bike lanes on the roads, and more bike paths throughout the area to accommodate more cycling. Safety becomes a big part of the formula too. With a greater need for bike friendly roads the need for safe cycling increases as well. Riders always need to pay attention to the traffic and conditions around them, no matter where they are riding. We Boomers know this. We didn’t get to this mature state by being stupid. Well, maybe a little, but learning takes all forms.

The event, and it is an event, comes with the opportunity to log the miles you ride. The goal this year in my area is for a total of 2 million miles to be pedaled up over the month. How are those miles counted? First, sign up at May is Bike Month in your region. You can sign up as an individual or with a team. It’s important to note that if you sign up for a team, you don’t actually have to ride with that team. When you do ride, you’ll log you miles and you and that team will get credit for your miles. Most areas have random drawings of participants for cycling gear.

When you sign up you’ll pledge a number of miles to ride during May. You can change that number any time you want. There isn’t any minimum or maximum involved. If you’ve done this before you know about how many miles you can get in, and may want to push you mileage up a bit. If this is your first time, just pick a number of miles that seems reasonable to ride.

At the end of each ride, log in to your May is Bike Month site, and enter your miles. It’s as simple as that. You’ll be able to see your cumulative total, the total for you team, and the total number of miles ridden by everyone. There is a bar graph that keeps track of progress towards the goal in your particular area.

It doesn’t matter what kind of bike you ride. From the most weird to the most elite bikes, everything is welcomed. Your age isn’t a factor either. Your children can register with you and ride on a balance bike or a bike with training wheels still on it. It simply has to be a bike, any kind of bike will do. They can log miles right along with you. This is simply a great way to encourage everyone to ride bikes. It isn’t a race, and the only competition is between you and the miles you pledge.

Sign up now, and start riding. Ride with your friends, family, or just enjoy your own bliss while pedaling. Watch the miles pile up and enjoy this fine, month long event. Check the events calendar on your local May is Bike Month website to see if there is an event that you’d like to experience.

The entire month is filled with things to do. It’s all just a great deal of fun, for everyone. You just might find a new appreciation for bikes too.

The video below is from the fine folks at Razik Bikes, who make an amazing bike. These handmade beauties just may inspire you to sign up and start riding.


Posted in bicycles, blogging, business, cycling, education, families, Handmade bikes, health, Uncategorized

Spring is here. New bike time?

Bamboo bike NAHBS. Photo courtesy of J Ferris.

Bamboo bike NAHBS. Photo courtesy of J Ferris.

Spring is different things in different parts of the country. Could be snowy, cold, cool, windy, sunny, warm, hot, rainy, or flooding. Depends on where you are. One constant is that it is at this time of year that the new bikes are paraded out for all of us to drool over. Bicycling, VeloNews, Dirt Rag, Mountain Bike and the others all start devoting a lot of space to the new bikes.

How new can they be, really? Frame, wheels, brakes, seat, handle bars. That about sums it up. Not even close really. The new bikes all have some sort of tweak that separates them from whatever came before. It’s not the paint job or any other cosmetic bling. The bikes have different angles, vibration dampers, frames, stems, brakes, cables. It may not seem like much when you look at it, but it does add up to a different feel for the new ones. Check out Razik Bicycles if you want to see what’s really different in a frame.  They really are different.

Adds up is a very appropriate term. Most of the manufacturers have very good bikes in the lower end of the price range, between $1,000-$2,500 or maybe a tad more. For most of us that’s the price range that’s comfortable. If you’re on the front tip of the Boomer range you’ll be 70 this year, and your retirement income has to be taken into consideration when looking at the bikes. When the price gets north of $3,000 my interest plummets. Actually, when it gets anywhere close to $3K my interest plummets.

When the price hikes up into that area the target audience isn’t ordinary riders. If you are in the top end of your club, a rated rider, or a very competitive type, those bikes up into the well over $4,000 range might make a difference in where you place at the end of the day. They are rather nice bikes. I’m not sure I’d notice the difference though.

I just ride, for the sheer fun of it and to stay healthy. That’s it. I would like to have a set of gears that make the climbs easier though. I live in the Sierra Nevada and nothing is flat. It’s a relative term up here.

Enjoy exploring the new crop of two wheeled wonders. It’s always fun, even if your wallet is bit light. No drooling on the bikes. It’s frowned on.


Posted in bicycles, blogging, business, cycling, families, Handmade bikes, health, Uncategorized